GFW Fires ANALYSES
During this time period, there were  fire alerts
Figure 1: DISTRIBUTION OF FIRE ALERTS
Active Fires
Figure 2a: DISTRICTS WITH THE GREATEST NUMBER OF FIRE ALERTS
Fire Alerts by Districts
Figure 2b: DISTRICTS WITH THE GREATEST NUMBER OF FIRE ALERTS
Figure 3a: SUBDISTRICTS WITH THE GREATEST NUMBER OF FIRE ALERTS
Fire Alerts by SubDistricts
Figure 3b: SUBDISTRICTS WITH THE GREATEST NUMBER OF FIRE ALERTS
Figure 4: FIRE ALERT COUNT JAN 1, 2013 - PRESENT
Figure 5: COMPANY CONCESSIONS WITH FIRE ALERTS
PULPWOOD CONCESSIONS WITH THE HIGHEST SHARE OF FIRE ALERTS
PALM OIL CONCESSIONS WITH THE HIGHEST SHARE OF FIRE ALERTS
LOGGING CONCESSIONS WITH THE HIGHEST SHARE OF FIRE ALERTS
Figure 6: RSPO CERTIFIED CONCESSIONS WITH FIRE ALERTS
Figure 7: FIRE ALERTS BY LAND USE AREA
Figure 8: FIRE ALERTS IN PROTECTED AREAS
Figure 9: PORTION OF FIRES OCCURRING ON PEATLAND
Figure 10: PORTION OF FIRES OCCURRING IN AN INDICATIVE MORATORIUM AREA

WRI used NASA’s Active Fire Data to determine the likely location of fires on the ground. This system uses the NASA MODIS satellites that survey the entire earth every 1-2 days. The sensors on these satellites detect the heat signatures of fires within the infrared spectral band. When the satellite imagery is processed, an algorithm searches for fire-like signatures. When a fire is detected, the system indicates the 1 km2 where the fire occurred with an “alert.” The system will nearly always detect fires of 1,000 m2 in size, but under ideal conditions, can detect flaming fires as small as 50 m2. Since each satellite passes over the equator twice a day, these alerts can be provided in near-real time. Fire alerts are posted on the NASA FIRMS website within 3 hours of detection by the satellite.

The accuracy of fire detection has improved greatly since fire detection systems were first developed for the MODIS satellites. Today, the rate of false positives is 1/10 to 1/1000 what it was under earlier systems first developed in the early 2000s. The algorithm used to detect fires includes steps to eliminate sources of false positives from sun glint, water glint, hot desert environments and others. When the system does not have enough information to detect a fire conclusively, the fire alert is discarded. In general, night observations have higher accuracy than daytime observations. Desert ecosystems have the highest rate of false positives. Many papers have been published to validate the NASA MODIS active fire alerts for use in various applications.

Sources:

NASA FIRMS FAQ Morton, D., R. DeFries, J. T. Randerson, L. Giglio, W. Schroeder, and G. van der Werf. 2008. Agricultural intensification increases deforestation fire activity in Amazonia. Global Change Biology 14:2262-2276.

Data Sources for Figures:

NASA Fire Information for Resource Management (FIRMS) Active Fire Data

Administrative boundaries from GADM and Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)